My food day.

There is a lot of press around these days about what you should and should not eat. Warnings about the levels of fat, or salt, or sugar or whatever else may have some negative effects; maybe. I will absolutely not argue that a diet of wine, cheese and processed meats is not great for you. What I will argue however is that there are benefits other than the easily measurable physiological ones. The joy of eating a grilled cheese sandwich, or some chocolate for instance; will leave you feeling happy. Something that has a high level of value, for me anyway. That isn’t to say that I don’t think you should try to be healthy with your food, just that there are more things to think about.

I eat a very small amount of red meat during the week in general, in part because of living on my own and the difficulty in getting reasonable portions for one person. But I have no issue in eating red meat, in fact I enjoy it greatly. Every Saturday my parents come around for chilli con carne, which of course contains beef.

Below is an example of a typical day’s food for me.

Breakfast

Smoked salmon and cream cheese on crumpets.

A glass of fruit juice and a cup of coffee.

Lunch

I rarely eat much for lunch when I’m not at work, I’ll usually stick to something quick and simple such as Soup and crusty bread.

Dinner

If I only had a small meal at lunch time then I will have something more substantial for dinner. Some sort of pasta dish is common, often with some variety of fish.

Snacks

I do of course get hungry between meals on occasion, and although I do like things such as chocolate I try to avoid eating them too often.

One of my favourite go to snacks is houmous with either carrot sticks or sugarsnap peas.

This is just an example of what I would eat on any given day. I’m not saying it is the best diet, nor is it something that would work for everybody. It just happens to work for me.

I think the best thing for anyone to do when looking at their diet is to pay attention to what your body is telling you. The recommended diet is designed for the average person, and in my experience the average person doesn’t exist. Eat and drink what you like, in moderation. If you notice yourself putting on some unwanted weight, change things. The same if you find you are not feeling well, or if your physical performance is suffering.

No one knows your body better than you.

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The amazing relaxation spots in Wiltshire.

This post is a part of my series looking into health and what we can do to keep ourselves healthy, while still enjoying life.

Click below to access the hub page for the health series:

A push for perfect health

20th April 2018

Every so often I like to remind myself just how amazing the county that I live in is. It is so easy to forget when you are driving past these places every day. I live less than 10 minutes from the world heritage site of Avebury, and about half an hour from Stonehenge. There is so much amazing countryside right on my doorstep, and I don’t know if I really appreciate it.

Today I went to Devizes to get a coffee and then drove to Silbury Hill to enjoy it in peace. I hope to go to one of our amazing landmarks or beauty spots after work every Friday during the coming summer.

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21st April 2018

This morning I drove into Marlborough from my hometown of Calne. The drive between these two towns only takes about 20 minutes, but it takes you through some of the best countryside this country has to offer. There are no mountains or valleys, no forests, nor any vast lakes but the chalk downs, rolling fields and abundance of ancient landmarks makes it such a beautiful place. This drive between the historic market town of Calne, the place Dr Joseph Priestley was living when he discovered oxygen and the even more historic town of Marlborough, where a burial mound dating back to around 2400BC is located within the grounds of the college, is one of the most amazing drives you can take. In particular, the stretch of road that goes through Cherhill past one of Wiltshire’s many famous white horses is particularly pleasant, especially in the sun with the windows down.

Perfect insomnia

This post is a part of my series looking into health and what we can do to keep ourselves healthy, while still enjoying life.

Click below to access the hub page for the health series:

A push for perfect health


If insomnia is something that I am destined to suffer, then at least I can try and enjoy it. This current balmy weather we are experiencing in the UK is perfect for late night walks. Although having time to think is probably something that is dangerous for sufferers of anxiety, it is better to do it while out enjoying a nice walk than to lay in bed awake all night letting the demons in.

The worst thing I find with my insomnia is that it has such a huge impact on my behaviour, especially the way I act around other people. I have discussed these issues with my friends in the past but, although they are supportive, I’m not sure they are really equipped to understand. I don’t blame them for this, after all, there are many behaviours exhibited by others that I cannot understand. Even as a sufferer of anxiety and depression I have a hard time really understanding the way it affects others. If we cannot understand our own feelings we cannot really expect others to.

One of my biggest fears is that people, however much they say they love you and however many times they say you can always talk to them, will eventually get bored or fed-up with your problems. I have recently gone very quiet with my best friend because I am scared that I have told her too much. We don’t really speak other than to say hello, I am basically avoiding contact with her at this point. This is clearly unhealthy for a relationship, but I really don’t know how to deal with the situation. I am actually hoping I can get out and use my sleeplessness as some thinking time to try and deal with this issue.

Over time I have come to respect insomnia as something that can actually benefit me to some degree, after all, everything I have tried to fix it has failed, may as well embrace it.

Photo by Simon Robben from Pexels

 

Bullet journaling: Relieving symptoms of anxiety.

This post is a part of my series looking into health and what we can do to keep ourselves healthy, while still enjoying life.

Click below to access the hub page for the health series:

A push for perfect health


 

One of the first things I started doing when I was first diagnosed with anxiety (GAD & SAD) was to start writing. Initially, it was so freeing to just get all of the messy thoughts and feelings out of my head and onto paper, after a while though I decided that I also needed to find a way of better organising my time. Bullet journaling was suggested by my psychologist as a way of achieving both of these things.

For those that don’t know, bullet journaling is a method of journaling that allows great flexibility in the way you use it. Using a blank journal, you are able to add whatever sections you want. I use a weekly planner, that I draw in myself as well as sections such as habit tracking and mood tracking.

Bullet journaling was created by an American digital product designer named Ryder Carroll. You can find out more here: http://bulletjournal.com/

I have found this system is so freeing and allows me to organise my life and clear my mind. I even have pages just for doodling, one of my favourite anxiety relief activities. I use Leuchtturm1917 notebooks for my bullet journal as well as other notebooks such as my doodle book and my college and work notebooks. There are Leuchtturm1917 notebooks designed specifically for bullet journals, these have a specially designed index page but are otherwise the same as the rest of the range. You can also choose between dotted, lined and plain paper depending on your preference (I use dotted).

Buy LEUCHTTURM1917 products here:

*This is an Amazon UK affiliate link.

The practice of bullet journaling is one of the best ways I have found of managing my anxiety, it is no longer something that rules my life. I will likely never be free from the grips of mental illness, but using methods like this it is easier to manage.

 

Photo by Jessica Lewis from Pexels